Leaf view
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Specimen Views # 13 Back ] Next ]

The Leaf View is used by botanists, registration authorities, and compilers of regional flora to precisely identify the leaves, leaflets, and their arrangement.

  Item Notes
1 Overall leaf length For simple leaves, this is the typical length from base to tip.  For compound leaves, this is the typical length of the full compound leaf.
2 Overall leaf width For simple leaves, this is the typical width across the widest portion of the leaf.  For compound leaves, this is the typical width of the full compound leaf.
3 Compound This is the keyword simple for simple leaves.  For compound leaves this is variously one of the compound or pinnate choices.
4 Number of leaflets For compound leaves only.  This is the number of leaflets per leaf.  This value may be a simple number, like "5", or a range of values like "11-15".
5 Arrangement A description of how the leaflets are arranged in relationship to each other -- something like alternate, opposite, whorled, etc.
6 Leaflet length For compound leaves only.  This is the typical length of a single leaflet from base to tip.
7 Leaflet width For compound leaves only.  This is the typical width of a single leaflet across its widest part.
8 Color The color(s) of the leaves.
9 Vernation A description of how the young leaves are arranged before the bud opens.  Many possibilities such as convolute, contorted, rovolute, wrinkled, and more.
10 Shape The overall appearance of a leaf's shape -- possible values include: crescent-shaped, fiddle-shaped, halbert-shaped, heart-shaped, kidney-shaped, needle-shaped, sword-shaped, and many more.
11 Apex The appearance of the leaf tip. Examples include: blunt, hooked, mucronate, or retuse.
12 Base The appearance of the leaf base where it attaches to the petiole.  Possibilities might be attenuate, cordate, hastate, truncate, and more.
13 Margin A description of the type of serration along the outer edges of the leaf.  Might be something like: curled, gnawed, crenated, sawed, toothed, etc.
14 Incision For deeply cut leaves, this is a description of how the divisions appear -- something like lobed, palmate, split, and so forth.
15 Venation A description of the pattern of veins within the leaf.  Examples include: divided, reticulated, pedate, peltate, ribbed, and more.
16 Hair A description of the downy, hairy, silky, spiny, velvety, or woolly covering on the leaves.
17 Polish A description of the particulate covering on the leaves -- possibilities include: dewy, dusty, greasy, powdery, slimy, etc.
18 Texture A description of the leaf's surface texture -- leathery, papery, spongy, waxy, etc.
19 Variegation The location and appearance of discolorations and other markings on the leaves: marbled, painted, spotted, striped, variegated, and so forth.

For an index to other topics see

   Specimen

 

Last reviewed March 25, 2004   

 

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