Ecologists & The Compleat Botanica: human/software symbiosis
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Verbena canadensis

Never ending summertime delight

Coarse leaves and stems bring forth lively color - spreads easily.


See what other people like you are doing with The Compleat Botanica

 

 

Customer profiles

   Botanist
   Ethnobotany
   Herbarium
   Horticulture
   Taxonomy
 

Others like you . . .

  Professional groups
  Specialties
  Botanical sciences
  Agriculture
  Gardening
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"Liu  says . . ."

Liu has a particular fondness for butterflies.  "I've been tracking butterfly/plant symbiosis in areas of low moisture."  She uses The Compleat Botanica to track which plant species are used for food and which are used for egg masses. 
 
Did you know?


Q:  Is there an easy way to expand the taxonomic checklist?

A:  Yes.  By double-clicking an item in the hierarchical checklist you can see all plant names one rank lower in the list.

If you double-click while holding down the <Ctrl> key, you can see all plant names two full ranks lower in the list.  When sub-ranks are available (such as sub-class or sub-order or sub-family), the sub-ranks down two full ranks are also included.  See the example below.  See the full story.

For more tips see

  The not so obvious . . .
 

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The Compleat Botanica and ecology
Record symbiotic relationships, keystone indicator species, and plant communities for an area of study.
Create hyperlinks between records to capture intricate relationships.
Use rich-text notes to record your research findings.
Use all of the other features of The Compleat Botanica to develop and publish plant-related reports with photographs.

 

Features for ecology


  Botanical spell-checker

  Flexible specimen lists

  Botanical name display

  Checklist of names

  All of the essential features of The Compleat Botanica
 

Data fields for ecology


Just a few of the data fields useful for ecologists:

  Native status

  Geographic origin

  FESA listing

  Plant community

  Biotic community

  Wetland indicator

  Symbiosis

  Alphabetical index of all 160 fields used by The Compleat Botanica

 

Software snapshots


There are 17 side-by-side data entry views making it easy to access and update your data.  Be sure to check out the Biodiversity view.

  See all 17 views . . .
 

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The Compleat Botanica is now specially priced.

Holiday sale $49.99
Offer expires December 14, 2009

  Holiday sale - save $40

 

Frequently asked questions


Q:
  Your product apparently uses the Imperial system of measurements. I saw "gallons" etc. in your description, and I haven't got the slightest idea what a gallon is.

A:  The Compleat Botanica allows you to choose whether to use metric or U.S. Customary System units.  Both systems are fully supported.  The two most important measurement scales for plants are length and temperature.  Length measurements can be represented in centimetres/metres or inches/feet.  Temperature measurements can be represented in Celsius or Fahrenheit.

The quaint American system for describing plant containers is to describe them in terms of their volume capacity; thus, we have "1 gallon pots".  (A gallon is a unit of volume equal to approximately 4.546 liters in the British Imperial System or 3.785 liters in the U.S. Customary System.)

See what other people are asking

 Frequently Asked Questions
 

Tips . . .


Q:
  There are three ways to add new specimen records to your collection.

A:  The first way is to find the appropriate botanical name in the taxonomic checklist and press the create new specimen button located in the bottom right-hand corner of the view. This works best if you know the true botanical name.

The second way is to search the vernacular list for the common name of the plant, then press the create new specimen button. This works well if you're unsure of the proper spelling of the botanical name or if you only know the common name.

The third way is to press the new specimen button at the bottom of the specimen list. This works best when you know the full botanical name of the specimen to be added. See the full story.

See more "how to" articles

 How do I . . .
 

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Last reviewed December 05, 2009   

 

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